Discovery and naming

Discovery and naming - Discovery and naming Callisto was...

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Discovery and naming Callisto was discovered by Galileo in January 1610 along with three other large Jovian moons— Ganymede , Io , and Europa . [1] Callisto is named after one of Zeus 's many lovers in Greek mythology . Callisto was a nymph (or, according to some sources, the daughter of Lycaon ) who was associated with the goddess of the hunt, Artemis . [20] The name was suggested by Simon Marius soon after the moon's discovery. [21] Marius attributed the suggestion to Johannes Kepler . [20] However, the names of the Galilean satellites fell into disfavor for a considerable time, and were not revived in common use until the mid-20th century. In much of the earlier astronomical literature, Callisto is referred to by its Roman numeral designation, a system introduced by Galileo, as Jupiter IV or as "the fourth satellite of Jupiter". [22] In scientific writing, the adjectival form of the name is Callistoan , [23] pronounced / ˌ k æ l ɨ ˈ s t o ʊ . ə n / , or Callistan . [14]
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Discovery and naming - Discovery and naming Callisto was...

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