Eclipse3 - Eclipses There are two regions of the shadow,...

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Eclipses There are two regions of the shadow, the umbra and penumbra . These correspond to the darkest part of the shadow and the not completely dark part respectively. These are shown in Figure 15. If you were on the Moon, and looked back toward the Earth (and the Sun), you would see the Sun blocked out if you were in the umbra, while if you were in the penumbra, some part of the Sun's surface would still be visible to you. Figure 15. The shadows, umbra and penumbra, cast by the Earth during a lunar eclipse. The Moon is experiencing a total lunar eclipse here since it is in the umbra - the darkest shadow. Lunar eclipses can be full - the Moon passes completely through the Earth's umbral shadow, partial - it passes only through part of the umbral shadow, or penumbral - it only passes through the penumbra. The best are of course the full eclipses, which can last for hours as the Moon traverses the entire length of the umbral shadow, while the least exciting are the penumbral eclipses, which are really difficult to see since the sunlight that falls on the
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Eclipse3 - Eclipses There are two regions of the shadow,...

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