Escape Velocit1 - Escape Velocity If you throw a rock up it...

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Unformatted text preview: Escape Velocity If you throw a rock up, it will rise up and then fall back down because of gravity. If you throw it up with a faster speed, it will rise higher before gravity brings it back down. If you throw it up fast enough it just escapes the gravity of the planet---the rock initially had a velocity equal to the escape velocity . The escape velocity is the initial velocity needed to escape a massive body's gravitational influence. In the Newton's Law of Gravity chapter the escape velocity is found to = Sqrt [(2 G × (planet or moon mass))/distance)]. The distance is measured from the planet or moon's center. Since the mass is in the top of the fraction, the escape velocity increases as the mass increases. A more massive planet will have stronger gravity and, therefore, a higher escape velocity. Also, because the distance is in the bottom of the fraction, the escape velocity decreases as the distance increases. The escape velocity is lower at greater heights above the planet's surface. The planet's increases....
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Escape Velocit1 - Escape Velocity If you throw a rock up it...

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