Finding Exoplanet1

Finding Exoplanet1 - Finding Exoplanets The animation above...

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Finding Exoplanets The animation above shows an extemely-magnified view of two possible microlens events (what you would see if you had an optical telescope several hundred meters across in space). The brightness of the ring and the combined brightness of the two distorted images exceed the distant star's brightness when it is not lensed. This animation is adapted from a figure by Penny Sackett in a talk about the search for planetary systems using microlenses . If the nearer star has a planetary system with a planet at the right position, a smaller and briefer microlens event will happen superimposed on top of the star's microlens. By looking for brief deviations in the otherwise smooth increase, then smooth decrease of a stellar microlens event, you could detect the presence of a planet. This method is called the microlens technique and is summarized in the figure below—select the image to view the full-size version in another window. The planet's mass and orbit size could be determined from careful measurements of the
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Finding Exoplanet1 - Finding Exoplanets The animation above...

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