Finding Exoplanet2

Finding Exoplanet2 - Finding Exoplanets The Kepler team has...

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Finding Exoplanets The Kepler team has created some nice interactives showing how the planet detection works as well as how the various planet parameters are derived . As of early 2011, Kepler had found over 1200 planetary candidates with almost 410 of them in 170 planetary systems with multiple planets. Candidate planets are those that have not been verified yet through follow-up observations to make sure the star dimming is not due to another star as in an eclipsing binary system or a dead star called a white dwarf . Sixteen planets have been confirmed, including one that is definitely a rocky planet with a density of 8.8 times that of water called Kepler 10b. However, Kepler 10b orbits less than 0.017 AU from its star (Mercury orbits our Sun at 0.39 AU), so its surface temperature is over 1800 K! Of the candidates (as of early 2011), 68 have diameters less than 1.25 Earth's and 54 candidates reside in their star's habitable zone and have diameters ranging from Earth-size to larger than Jupiter with one having the sought for
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Finding Exoplanet2 - Finding Exoplanets The Kepler team has...

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