Galaxy Collisions and Merger2

Galaxy Collisions and Merger2 - Galaxy Collisions and...

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Galaxy Collisions and Mergers Here are some photographs of examples of these collisions. The first is the Antennae Galaxies as viewed from the ground (left) and from the Hubble Space Telescope (right). Note the large number of H II regions produced from the collision. The second is the Cartwheel Galaxy as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. A large spiral was hit face-on by one of the two galaxies to the right of the ring. The insets on the left show details of the clumpy ring structure and the core of the Cartwheel. Selecting the images will bring up an enlarged version in another window. See Mihos' galaxy modelling website for simulations of the creation of the Cartwheel Galaxy. The gas clouds in galaxies are much larger than the stars, so they will very likely hit the clouds in another galaxy when the galaxies collide. When the clouds hit each other, they compress and collapse to form a lot of stars in a short time. Galaxies undergoing such a burst of star formation are called starburst galaxies and they can be the among the most luminous of galaxies.
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Galaxy Collisions and Merger2 - Galaxy Collisions and...

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