How to work out those annoying angle probl

How to work out those annoying angle probl - How to work...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How to work out those annoying angle probl ems Here's one that is a bit more confusing - what would the height of an object be if it has a declination of 80º N? If you follow the preceding logic, you'd find that it is 52.5º above the northern horizon. Wait a second, isn't 80º N just 10º away from the North Celestial pole? Yes, 90- 10=80. Okay, so the object is 10° from the North Star, Polaris. That's fine. Now here's the tricky bit - how can you be sure of which side of Polaris the object is at? I hate to admit it, but this is a trick question, since there are actually two correct answers. How is that possible? You remember those stars that never set, circumpolar stars? That means at one time they are found above the North Celestial Pole and at another time they can be found on the other side, or below the North Celestial Pole, since they have to go in a circular path around Polaris. This is shown in Figure 10. I'll try to avoid these kinds of questions, since they are confusing.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

How to work out those annoying angle probl - How to work...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online