Mass Cutoff Explained

Mass Cutoff Explained - Mass Cutoff Explained The principle...

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Mass Cutoff Explained The principle of hydrostatic equilibrium and nuclear fusion theory also explain why stars have a certain range of masses. The stars have masses between 0.08 and about 100 solar masses. Stars with too little mass do not have enough gravitational compression in their cores to produce the required high temperatures and densities needed for fusion of ordinary hydrogen. The lowest mass is about 0.08 solar masses or about 80 Jupiter masses. A star less massive than this does not undergo fusion of ordinary hydrogen but if it is more massive than about 13 Jupiters it can fuse the heavier isotope of hydrogen, deuterium, in the first part of its life. Stars in this boundary zone between ordinary stars and gas planets are called brown dwarfs . After whatever deuterium fusion it does while it is young, a brown dwarf then just slowly radiates away the heat from that fusion and that left over from its formation. Among the first brown dwarfs discovered is the companion orbiting the star Gliese 229. Selecting the picture below of Gliese 229 and its
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Mass Cutoff Explained - Mass Cutoff Explained The principle...

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