Motion of the S12

Motion of the S12 - started This motion results in our seeing the Sun in front of stars of different constellations over the course of the year

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Motion of the Sun Why is it like this? Why does the Sun travel on its own unusual path? Here is where I get to shatter all of your delusions - there is no Santa Claus! Oh, wait, that wasn't the delusion I was supposed to shatter. No, the concept I get to confuse you with is concerning all these motions I have described so far. The stars do not move across the sky in approximately 24 hours. The Sun does not move across the sky in approximately 24 hours. The Sun does not travel amongst the stars and moves slowly eastward each day. If they aren't moving, what is? WE ARE! Almost all the motions of the sky are due to motions of the Earth. The main motion is the rotation of the Earth. We spin around once in approximately 24 hours - that is why we see the stars and Sun appear to move in about 24 hours. What about the Sun moving eastward relative to the stars over the course of the year? Again, we are doing it - we are moving around the Sun, and it takes one year for us to get back to where we
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Unformatted text preview: started. This motion results in our seeing the Sun in front of stars of different constellations over the course of the year. Figure 3 illustrates this concept. I'm not saying that nothing in the Universe moves except for the Earth - it's just that the Earth's motion is so large, so close, and so obvious to our senses that it has the greatest influence on how we see the sky. As you'll see, practically everything in the Universe moves. Figure 3. The apparent motion of the Sun amongst the stars is due to the motion of the Earth around the Sun and our changing viewpoint. The stars that we would see behind the Sun in January would be different from the stars we would see behind the Sun in February, March, and every other month, since we are changing the location from which we view the Sun....
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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