Motions - Motions/Events of the Moon After the Sun the Moon is the most obvious thing in the sky Even on hazy or semi-cloudy nights it is often

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Motions/Events of the Moon After the Sun, the Moon is the most obvious thing in the sky. Even on hazy or semi-cloudy nights, it is often possible to spot the Moon, so what are its motions that people have to worry about? It rises somewhere along the eastern horizon and sets somewhere along the western horizon, but again not generally in the same place from one day to the next. Unlike the Sun, there are no special days when the Moon will rise due East or set due West. The time that the Moon rises or sets is not always the same - it varies; typically it will rise about one hour later each night. The path it appears to travel is not the same as the path of the Sun; sometimes it is on a more southernly path (so it is below the Sun's path as we view it from Iowa), and sometimes it is on a more northernly path (above the Sun's path). The most obvious aspect of the Moon is its appearance. These are the phases that the Moon goes through. It takes about one month for the entire phase cycle to be completed.
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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