Mountains - Mountains The figure also shows the effect of...

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Mountains The figure also shows the effect of mountains. The mountains on the Earth are high in comparison to the thickness of our troposphere so they can provide a significant barrier to the circulation of air or change the circulation patterns. They can also "speed up" the condensation- precipitation process by forcing side-ways moving air to rise upward leading to storms on the mountainsides that face the prevailing winds. Air on the other side of the mountains is much drier so the land on the other side has little rainfall---a " rain shadow ". Some example rain shadows include the southern part of the San Joaquin valley in California (formed by the Diablo Range and the Tehachapi Mountains), the eastern half of Oregon and Washington (formed by the Cascade Range), and the Atacama Desert (the driest place on Earth formed by the Chilean Coast Range). Ocean Currents Our oceans also affect atmospheric circulation by transporting heat energy and water, heating or cooling the land and air. For example, the California Current is a current in the Pacific Ocean
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Mountains - Mountains The figure also shows the effect of...

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