Newton1 - Newton's Laws of Motion An acceleration is a...

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Newton's Laws of Motion An acceleration is a change in the speed and/or direction of motion in a given amount of time: acceleration = (the velocity change)/(the time interval of the change). Something at rest is not accelerating and something moving at constant speed in a straight line is not accelerating. In common usage, acceleration usually means just a change in speed, but a satellite orbiting a planet is constantly being accelerated even if its speed is constant because its direction is constantly being deflected. The satellite must be experiencing a force since it is accelerating. That force turns out to be gravity. If the force (gravity) were to suddenly disappear, the satellite would move off in a straight line along a path tangent to the original circular orbit. A rock in your hand is moving horizontally as it spins around the center of the Earth, just like you and the rest of the things on the surface are. If you throw the rock straight up, there is no change in its horizontal
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Newton1 - Newton's Laws of Motion An acceleration is a...

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