Nuclear Fusion Needs Extreme Temperatures and Densities

Nuclear Fusion Needs Extreme Temperatures and Densities -...

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Nuclear Fusion Needs Extreme Temperatures and Densities To get those nuclei close enough together requires high temperatures and high densities. At high temperatures the nuclei move fast enough to be driven close enough together for them to fuse. The high densities ensure that there are enough nuclei within in a small volume for the collisions to take place at all. The only place these extreme conditions occur naturally is in the cores of stars. The temperatures in the cores of stars are above the approximately 8 million K needed to fuse hydrogen nuclei together. The amount of repulsion is larger for nuclei with more positive charge so the fusion of elements with greater positive charge requires greater temperatures and densities than that needed for fusing elements with small positive charge. This is why stars fuse hydrogen nuclei before they fuse other nuclei. For example, the fusion of helium nuclei requires temperatures above 100 million K and heavier nuclei require even higher temperatures. You will
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Nuclear Fusion Needs Extreme Temperatures and Densities -...

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