Olbers - Olbers Paradox and the Dark Night Sky Another simple observation is that the visible night sky is dark IF the universe is infinite eternal

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Olbers' Paradox and the Dark Night Sky Another simple observation is that the visible night sky is dark. IF the universe is infinite, eternal, and static, then the sky should be as bright as the surface of the Sun all of the time! Heinrich Olbers (lived 1758--1840) popularized this paradox in 1826, but he was not the first to come up with this conclusion. Thomas Digges wrote about it in 1576, Kepler stated it in 1610, and Edmund Halley and Jean Philippe de Cheseaux talked about it in the 1720's, but Olbers stated it very clearly, so he was given credit for it. This problem is called Olbers' Paradox . If the universe is uniformly filled with stars, then no matter which direction you look, your line of sight will eventually intersect a star (or other bright thing). Now it is known that stars are grouped into galaxies, but the paradox remains: your line of sight will eventually intersect a galaxy.
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Olbers - Olbers Paradox and the Dark Night Sky Another simple observation is that the visible night sky is dark IF the universe is infinite eternal

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