Origin and evolution

Origin and evolution - Origin and evolution The partial...

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Origin and evolution The partial differentiation of Callisto (inferred e.g. from moment of inertia measurements) means that it has never been heated enough to melt its ice component. [17] Therefore, the most favorable model of its formation is a slow accretion in the low-density Jovian subnebula —a disk of the gas and dust that existed around Jupiter after its formation. [16] Such a prolonged accretion stage would allow cooling to largely keep up with the heat accumulation caused by impacts, radioactive decay and contraction, thereby preventing melting and fast differentiation. [16] The allowable timescale of formation of Callisto lies then in the range 0.1 million–10 million years. [16] Views of eroding (top) and mostly eroded (bottom) ice knobs (~100 m high), possibly formed from the ejecta of an ancient impact The further evolution of Callisto after accretion was determined by the balance of the radioactive heating, cooling through thermal conduction near the surface, and solid state or subsolidus
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Origin and evolution - Origin and evolution The partial...

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