PERSPECTIVE FROM OUTER SPACE

PERSPECTIVE FROM OUTER SPACE - PERSPECTIVE FROM OUTER SPACE...

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PERSPECTIVE FROM OUTER SPACE Today we know that the earth orbits the sun in exactly one year. The annual motion of stars is therefore really a consequence of the earth's orbit, and the fact that we observe the stars from a moving platform. Figure 4 shows how this works. It's a view of the earth and its solar orbit from above the north pole, and the orbit is in the counter-clockwise direction. We want to show an observer looking at the sky at the same time every night. So in the diagram each picture of the earth is at a time when the observer (in New York) is in the dark; he's facing directly away from the sun and it is midnight. The stars are not moving; they are in a fixed position shown toward the right of the diagram. In picture A the observer has to look toward the east to see the stars. (If he looks directly overhead (arrow) he doesn't see them.) Picture B is about 4 months later, about one-third of the way around the orbit. Here he has to look west to see the stars. So the apparent motion is that they have drifted from east to west. Picture C is another
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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PERSPECTIVE FROM OUTER SPACE - PERSPECTIVE FROM OUTER SPACE...

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