Physics and Chemistry of Ice

Physics and Chemistry of Ice - which the transitions to...

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Physics and Chemistry of Ice The physics and chemistry of ice is very important in the outer solar system. Ice has a number of forms, and the usual form of ice that we see on Earth - Ice I - is transformed under pressure to different crystal structures. Thus when a large body is built up from ice, or largely from ice, the type of ice of which it is composed will change with size. We can illustrate this with a diagram showing how increasing size produces increasing pressure and so an increasing tendency to produce Ice II, Ice III etc in larger and larger proportions: This shows the self-compression effect under gravitational pressure, and assumes isothermal pure ice at 103K. The lower the temperature and the more the impurities the lower the depth at
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Unformatted text preview: which the transitions to higher forms take place, generally. Note that at around 800km and again at about 2000 km radius one expects discontinuities in the average density. This is true also of ice-rock mixtures at somewhat lower sizes. The phase diagram for water is complex because of the different types of ice: Water is "peculiar" in that ice I is less dense than the liquid - so down to -22 degrees C and 2115 bar pressure wdegrees C and 2115 bar pressure will induce melting. At 'larger' pressures ice behaves 'normally' and would not be melted at any depth. At very high pressure you can get ice formed even at >273 K....
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Physics and Chemistry of Ice - which the transitions to...

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