Planetary Nebula or Supernov1

Planetary Nebula or Supernov1 - Planetary Nebula or...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Planetary Nebula or Supernova Further explanation of the causes of the sometimes bizarre shapes of the planetary nebula is available at Bruce Balick's homepage. The rare high-mass stars (those with masses of about 8 to 50 times the Sun's mass during their main sequence stage) will go the explosive supernova route. When a massive star's iron core implodes, the protons and electrons fuse together to form neutrons and neutrinos. The core, once the size of the Earth, becomes a very stiff neutron star about the size of a small town in less than a second. The infalling outer layers hit the core and heat up to billions of degrees from the impact. Enough of the huge number of neutrinos produced when the core collapses interact with the gas in outer layers, helping to heat it up. During the supernova outburst, elements heavier than iron are produced as free neutrons produced in the explosion rapidly combine with heavy nuclei to produce heavier and very rare nuclei like gold, platinum, uranium among others. This
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

Planetary Nebula or Supernov1 - Planetary Nebula or...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online