Planetary Nebula or Supernova

Planetary Nebula or Supernova - Planetary Nebula or...

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Planetary Nebula or Supernova A famous supernova remnant is the Crab Nebula above. Chinese astronomers recorded the explosion on July 4, 1054 and the Anasazi Indians painted at least one picture of it. The Vela supernova (in the constellation Vela; figure below) occurred long before the Crab Nebula so it is much more spread out. Different parts of the expanding gas have run into regions of the interstellar medium of different densities. For that reason and also because there is turbulence in the expanding supernova gas, the remnant seen today is wispy strands of glowing gas. The neutrinos formed when the neutron core is created fly away from the stiff core, carrying most of the energy (over 99%) from the core collapse away with them. Some energy (less than1%) goes into driving the gas envelope outward. The rest of the energy (less than only 0.01%) goes into making the supernova as bright as 10 11 Suns (as bright as an entire galaxy)! When a supernova occurred in a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way at the beginning of 1987
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Planetary Nebula or Supernova - Planetary Nebula or...

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