Solar Atmosphere

Solar Atmosphere - Solar Atmosphere Moving outward from the...

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Solar Atmosphere Moving outward from the core to the surface of the Sun, the temperature and density of the gas decreases. This trend in the density continues outward in the Sun's atmosphere. However, the temperature increases above the photosphere. The cause of the temperature increase is not well known but it involves some combination of sonic waves and magnetic waves from shaking magnetic loops above sunspots, numerous nanoflares, and wiggling jets in the chromosphere known as spicules to heat the atmosphere. Chromosphere During solar eclipses a thin pink layer can be seen at the edge of the dark Moon. This colorful layer is called the chromosphere (it means ``color sphere''). The chromosphere is only 2000 to 3000 kilometers thick. Its temperature rises outward away from the photosphere. Because it has a low density, you see emission lines of hydrogen (mostly at the red wavelength of 656.3 nanometers) The thin chromosphere is visible in this solar eclipse picture. Corona
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Solar Atmosphere - Solar Atmosphere Moving outward from the...

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