Subsequent observations

Subsequent observations - Subsequent observations Changes...

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Subsequent observations Changes in surface features in the eight years between Galileo and New Horizons observations Following Galileo 's deliberate demise in Jupiter's atmosphere in September 2003, new observations of Io's volcanism came from Earth-based telescopes. In particular, adaptive optics imaging from the Keck telescope in Hawaii and imaging from the Hubble telescope have allowed astronomers to monitor Io's active volcanoes. [43] [44] This imaging has allowed scientists to monitor volcanic activity on Io, even without a spacecraft in the Jupiter system. The New Horizons spacecraft, en route to Pluto and the Kuiper belt , flew by the Jupiter system and Io on February 28, 2007. During the encounter, numerous distant observations of Io were obtained. These included images of a large plume at Tvashtar, providing the first detailed observations of the largest class of Ionian volcanic plume since observations of Pele's plume in 1979. [45]
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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