Cryovolcanism - Cryovolcanism Figure 12: Plumes above the...

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Cryovolcanism Figure 12: Plumes above the limb of Enceladus feeding the E ring. These appear to emanate from the "tiger stripes" near the south pole. (View from Cassini spacecraft) Figure 13: Heat map (within white box) of the thermally active field of fractures, measured at wavelengths between 12 and 16 micrometers, superimposed on a visual-light image. One of the four fractures (right) was only partially imaged. Cassini views the backlit south polar plumes of Enceladus from a distance of 190,000 km.
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Following the Voyager encounters with Enceladus in the early 1980s, scientists postulated that the moon may be geologically active based on its young, reflective surface and location near the core of the E ring. [29] Based on the connection between Enceladus and the E ring, it was thought that Enceladus was the source of material in the E ring, perhaps through venting of water vapor from Enceladus's interior. However, the Voyagers failed to provide conclusive evidence that Enceladus is active today. Thanks to data from a number of instruments on the Cassini spacecraft in 2005,
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Cryovolcanism - Cryovolcanism Figure 12: Plumes above the...

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