Discovery and naming

Discovery and naming - Discovery and naming On January 7,...

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Unformatted text preview: Discovery and naming On January 7, 1610, Galileo Galilei observed what he believed were three stars near Jupiter, including what turned out to be Ganymede, Callisto , and one body that turned out to be the combined light from Io and Europa; the next night he noticed that they had moved. On January 13, he saw all four at once for the first time, but had seen each of the moons before this date at least once. By January 15, Galileo came to the conclusion that the stars were actually bodies orbiting Jupiter. [1] [2] [3] He claimed the right to name the moons; he considered "Cosmian Stars" and settled on " Medicean Stars ". [19] Size comparison of Earth , the Moon , and Ganymede. The French astronomer Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc suggested individual names from the Medici family for the moons, but his proposal was not taken up. [19] Simon Marius , who had originally claimed to have found the Galilean satellites, [21] tried to name the moons the "Saturn of Jupiter", the "Jupiter of Jupiter" (this was Ganymede), the "Venus of Jupiter", and the "Mercury...
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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