Internal heat - 1.1 times as much energy as it receives from the Sun[85 while Neptune radiates about 2.61 times as much energy as it receives from

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Internal heat Four images taken a few hours apart with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3. [82] Neptune's more varied weather when compared to Uranus is believed to be due in part to its higher internal heat. [83] Although Neptune lies half again as far from the Sun as Uranus, and receives only 40% its amount of sunlight, [13] the two planets' surface temperatures are roughly equal. [83] The upper regions of Neptune's troposphere reach a low temperature of −221.4 °C (51.8 K). At a depth where the atmospheric pressure equals 1 bar (100 kPa ), the temperature is −201.15 °C (72.00 K). [84] Deeper inside the layers of gas, the temperature rises steadily. As with Uranus, the source of this heating is unknown, but the discrepancy is larger: Uranus only radiates
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Unformatted text preview: 1.1 times as much energy as it receives from the Sun; [85] while Neptune radiates about 2.61 times as much energy as it receives from the Sun. [86] Neptune is the farthest planet from the Sun, yet its internal energy is sufficient to drive the fastest planetary winds seen in the Solar System. Several possible explanations have been suggested, including radiogenic heating from the planet's core, [87] conversion of methane under high pressure into hydrogen, diamond and longer hydrocarbons (the hydrogen and diamond would then rise and sink, respectively, releasing gravitational potential energy ), [87] [88] and convection in the lower atmosphere that causes gravity waves to break above the tropopause....
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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