Multi - Multi-wavelength observation A visual light image...

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Multi-wavelength observation A visual light image of Andromeda Galaxy shows the emission of ordinary stars and the light reflected by dust. This ultraviolet image of Andromeda shows blue regions containing young, massive stars. Infrared emission, shown in orange, maps out Andromeda's clouds of dust being heated by young stars in their interiors. X-ray emission, shown in blue, gives the position of massive dead stars. After galaxies external to the Milky Way were found to exist, initial observations were made mostly using visible light . The peak radiation of most stars lies here, so the observation of the stars that form galaxies has been a major component of optical astronomy . It is also a favorable
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portion of the spectrum for observing ionized H II regions , and for examining the distribution of dusty arms. The dust present in the interstellar medium is opaque to visual light. It is more transparent to far- infrared , which can be used to observe the interior regions of giant molecular clouds and galactic
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Multi - Multi-wavelength observation A visual light image...

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