Orbit1 - Because Uranus orbits the Sun almost on its side,...

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Orbit Titania orbits Uranus at the distance of about 436,000 km, being the second farthest from the planet among its five major moons. [f] Titania's orbit has a small eccentricity and is inclined very little relative to the equator of Uranus. [3] Its orbital period is around 8.7 days, coincident with its rotational period . In other words, Titania is a synchronous or tidally locked satellite, with one face always pointing toward the planet. [6] Titania's orbit lies completely inside the Uranian magnetosphere . [19] This is important, because the trailing hemispheres of satellites orbiting inside a magnetosphere are struck by magnetospheric plasma, which co-rotates with the planet. [20] This bombardment may lead to the darkening of the trailing hemispheres, which is actually observed for all Uranian moons except Oberon (see below). [19]
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Unformatted text preview: Because Uranus orbits the Sun almost on its side, and its moons orbit in the planet's equatorial plane, they (including Titania) are subject to an extreme seasonal cycle. Both northern and southern poles spend 42 years in a complete darkness, and another 42 years in continuous sunlight, with the sun rising close to the zenith over one of the poles at each solstice . [19] The Voyager 2 flyby coincided with the southern hemisphere's 1986 summer solstice, when nearly the entire northern hemisphere was unilluminated. Once every 42 years, when Uranus has an equinox and its equatorial plane intersects the Earth, mutual occultations of Uranus' moons become possible. In 20072008 a number of such events were observed including two occultations of Titania by Umbriel on August 15 and December 8, 2007...
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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