Other morphologies

Other morphologies - Other morphologies Hoag's Object, an...

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Other morphologies Hoag's Object , an example of a ring galaxy NGC 5866 , an example of a lenticular galaxy Peculiar galaxies are galactic formations that develop unusual properties due to tidal interactions with other galaxies. An example of this is the ring galaxy , which possesses a ring-like structure of stars and interstellar medium surrounding a bare core. A ring galaxy is thought to occur when a smaller galaxy passes through the core of a spiral galaxy. [61] Such an event may have affected the Andromeda Galaxy , as it displays a multi-ring-like structure when viewed in infrared radiation. [62] A lenticular galaxy is an intermediate form that has properties of both elliptical and spiral galaxies. These are categorized as Hubble type S0, and they possess ill-defined spiral arms with an elliptical halo of stars. [63] ( Barred lenticular galaxies receive Hubble classification SB0.) In addition to the classifications mentioned above, there are a number of galaxies that can not be readily classified into an elliptical or spiral morphology. These are categorized as irregular
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Other morphologies - Other morphologies Hoag's Object, an...

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