Radio structure2

Radio structure2 - Radio structures Pseudo-colour image of...

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Unformatted text preview: Radio structures Pseudo-colour image of the large-scale radio structure of the FRII radio galaxy 3C98. Lobes, jet and hotspot are labelled. Radio galaxies, and to a lesser extent, radio-loud quasars display a wide range of structures in radio maps. The most common large-scale structures are called lobes : these are double, often fairly symmetrical, roughly ellipsoidal structures placed on either side of the active nucleus. A significant minority of low-luminosity sources exhibit structures usually known as plumes which are much more elongated. Some radio galaxies show one or two long narrow features known as jets (the most famous example being the giant galaxy M87 in the Virgo cluster ) coming directly from the nucleus and going to the lobes. Since the 1970s, [3] [4] the most widely accepted model has been that the lobes or plumes are powered by beams of high-energy particles and magnetic field coming from close to the active nucleus. The jets are believed to be the visible manifestations of coming from close to the active nucleus....
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Radio structure2 - Radio structures Pseudo-colour image of...

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