Satellites - Satellites Pluto and Charon as taken with the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Pluto and Charon as taken with the ESA/Dornier Faint Object Camera on Hubble Space Telescope in 1994 Main article: Moons of Pluto Pluto has four known natural satellites : Charon , first identified in 1978 by astronomer James Christy ; Nix and Hydra , both discovered in 2005, [97] and S/2011 P 1 (provisional name, also known as P4), identified by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2011. [98] The Plutonian moons are unusually close to Pluto, compared to other observed systems. Moons could potentially orbit Pluto up to 53% (or 69%, if retrograde) of the Hill sphere radius, the stable gravitational zone of Pluto's influence. For example, Psamathe orbits Neptune at 40% of the Hill radius. In the case of Pluto, only the inner 3% of the zone is known to be occupied by satellites. In the discoverers’ terms, the Plutonian system appears to be "highly compact and largely empty", [99] although others have pointed out the possibility of additional objects, including a small ring system. [100]
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Satellites - Satellites Pluto and Charon as taken with the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online