Size and shape - Size and shape Figure 4: Enceladus (top...

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Unformatted text preview: Size and shape Figure 4: Enceladus (top left) transits Titan, as seen from Cassini on February 5, 2006. Enceladus was 4.1 million km away, and Titan a further 1.2 million km. Figure 5: NASA JPL to-scale size comparison of Enceladus. Enceladus is a relatively small satellite, with a mean diameter of 505 kilometers (314 mi), only one-seventh the diameter of Earth's own Moon . In diameter Enceladus is small enough to fit within the length of the island of Great Britain . It could also fit comfortably within the states of Arizona or Colorado , although as a spherical object its surface area is much greater, just over 800,000 square kilometers (310,000 sq mi), almost the same as Mozambique , or 15% larger than Texas . Its mass and diameter make Enceladus the sixth most massive and largest satellite of Saturn, after Titan (5150 km), Rhea (1530 km), Iapetus (1440 km), Dione (1120 km) and Tethys (1050 km). It is also one of the smallest of Saturn's spherical satellites, since all smaller satellites except km)....
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Size and shape - Size and shape Figure 4: Enceladus (top...

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