Storms - Voyager 2 approached the planet, a bright core...

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Storms The Great Dark Spot, as imaged by Voyager 2 In 1989, the Great Dark Spot , an anti-cyclonic storm system spanning 13000×6600 km, [70] was discovered by NASA 's Voyager 2 spacecraft. The storm resembled the Great Red Spot of Jupiter. Some five years later, on November 2, 1994, the Hubble Space Telescope did not see the Great Dark Spot on the planet. Instead, a new storm similar to the Great Dark Spot was found in the planet's northern hemisphere. [77] The Scooter is another storm, a white cloud group farther south than the Great Dark Spot. Its nickname is due to the fact that when first detected in the months before the 1989 Voyager 2 encounter it moved faster than the Great Dark Spot. [73] Subsequent images revealed even faster clouds. The Small Dark Spot is a southern cyclonic storm, the second-most-intense storm observed during the 1989 encounter. It initially was completely dark, but as
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Unformatted text preview: Voyager 2 approached the planet, a bright core developed and can be seen in most of the highest-resolution images. [78] Neptune's dark spots are thought to occur in the troposphere at lower altitudes than the brighter cloud features, [79] so they appear as holes in the upper cloud decks. As they are stable features that can persist for several months, they are thought to be vortex structures. [51] Often associated with dark spots are brighter, persistent methane clouds that form around the tropopause layer. [80] The persistence of companion clouds shows that some former dark spots may continue to exist as cyclones even though they are no longer visible as a dark feature. Dark spots may dissipate when they migrate too close to the equator or possibly through some other unknown mechanism. [...
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