Supermassive black hole

Supermassive black hole - ) can be equal to (for 1.8110 8...

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Supermassive black hole A gas cloud with several times the mass of the Earth is accelerating towards a supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. Top: artist's conception of a supermassive black hole tearing apart a star. Bottom: images believed to show a supermassive black hole devouring a star in galaxy RXJ 1242-11. Left: X-ray image, Right: optical image. [1] A supermassive black hole is the largest type of black hole in a galaxy, on the order of hundreds of thousands to billions of solar masses . Most, and possibly all galaxies , including the Milky Way , [2] are believed to contain supermassive black holes at their centers . [3] [4] Supermassive black holes have properties which distinguish them from lower-mass classifications: The average density of a supermassive black hole (defined as the mass of the black hole divided by the volume within its Schwarzschild radius
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Unformatted text preview: ) can be equal to (for 1.8110 8 solar mass black holes) or less than (for >1.8110 8 solar mass black holes) the density of water [5] . This is because the Schwarzschild radius is directly proportional to mass , while density is inversely proportional to the volume. Since the volume of a spherical object (such as the event horizon of a non-rotating black hole) is directly proportional to the cube of the radius, the density of a black hole is inversely proportional to the square of the mass, and thus higher mass black holes have lower average density. The tidal forces in the vicinity of the event horizon are significantly weaker. Since the central singularity is so far away from the horizon, a hypothetical astronaut traveling towards the black hole center would not experience significant tidal force until very deep into the black hole....
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2011 for the course AST AST1002 taught by Professor Emilyhoward during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Supermassive black hole - ) can be equal to (for 1.8110 8...

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