World History Ch. 12

World History Ch. 12 - Chapter 12 The domination by one...

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Chapter 12
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The domination by one country of the political, economic, or cultural life of another country or region. Establishing authority over areas of the world outside a country’s natural boundaries. Establishing colonies throughout the world. To distinguish it from the imperialism of the 16 th and 17 th centuries the imperialism of the 19 th and early 20 th century is called the New Imperialism .
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Nationalism was both an incentive for nations to practice imperialism and a reason why some national groups resisted imperialism. One form of nationalism is extreme pride in one’s country. This type of nationalism caused rival European nations to build empires in a competitive quests for power. This type of nationalism was resulted in a desire to expand and be more powerful than other nations. A desire by a national group to have its own state or country was another form of nationalism. These two types of nationalism often came into conflict with each other.
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The Industrial Revolution . Created a desire for sources of raw materials and new markets . The “White man’s burden ” was the belief that white men had a duty to introduce other people to the benefits of Western society. The “White man’s burden” was as much a justification of imperialism as it was a cause of imperialism. Social Darwinism applied the concept of “survival of the fittest” to human groups. Social Darwinism was also both a cause for imperialism and a justification of imperialism.
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Military motives. Imperial powers often claimed that colonies were needed for national security. One military motive for imperialism was the desire for naval bases in other parts of the world to to refuel steam ships. Humanitarian and Religious goals. Many Westerners felt a genuine concern for peoples in other parts of the world. Missionaries, doctors, and colonial officials believed they had a duty to spread the blessings of Western civilization. This was a form of the “White man’s burden.” Colonies also offered a valuable outlet for Europe’s growing population.
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Weakness of Non-Western states. While European nations had grown stronger in the 1800s, several older civilizations were in decline. These included the Ottoman’s in the Middle East, the Mughal empire in India, and the Qing dynasty in China. European powers had strong economies, well- organized governments, and powerful armies and navies. Quinine and other medical knowledge helped Europeans survive tropical diseases. The Maxim machine gun , repeating rifles, and steam driven warships all gave Western imperial powers a military advantage.
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Africans and Asians strongly resisted Western expansion into their lands. They fought even though they often had
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World History Ch. 12 - Chapter 12 The domination by one...

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