44093_CH24_PPT - Chapter 24 Abdominal Injuries Introduction...

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Chapter 24 Abdominal Injuries
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Introduction Blunt abdominal trauma is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in all ages.
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Abdominal Cavity Largest cavity in the body Extends from the diaphragm to the pelvis Assessment should be made quickly and cautiously.
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Prevention Strategies Reduction of morbidity and mortality Safety equipment Prehospital education Advances in hospital care Development of trauma systems
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You are dispatched to the home of an older person who has fallen. When you arrive, you find the patient between the bed and a wall. He is conscious, alert, and orientated, answering all questions and following all commands.
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Anatomy Review (1 of 5) Anatomic boundaries Diaphragm to pelvic brim Divided into three sections Anterior abdomen Flanks Posterior abdomen or back
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Anatomy Review (2 of 5) A. Anterior view B. Posterior view
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Anatomy Review (3 of 5)
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Anatomy Review (4 of 5) Peritoneum Membrane that covers the abdominal cavity
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Anatomy Review (5 of 5) The internal abdomen is divided into three regions: Peritoneal space Retroperitoneal space Pelvis
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Abdominal Organs (1 of 4) Three types of organs Solid Hollow Vascular
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Abdominal Organs (2 of 4)
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Abdominal Organs (3 of 4)
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Abdominal Organs (4 of 4)
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The spleen and liver are the organs most commonly injured during blunt trauma. Few signs and symptoms may be present. Must have a high index of suspicion.
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44093_CH24_PPT - Chapter 24 Abdominal Injuries Introduction...

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