23 - Firearm Injuries Part2

23 - Firearm Injuries Part2 - Rifled Weapon Wounds Rifled...

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Rifled Weapon Wounds Rifled Weapon Wounds Done by : Salsabeel A. Matalqah Rawan M. Jaradat
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Rifles are long-barrelled guns that may be single-shot, bolt- loaded or self-loading and used for hunting, target shooting or for military purposes. The muzzle velocity varies greatly, from 1500- 5000 feet/second. Rifled weapons include handguns – pistols and revolvers, and rifles. Firearm injuries are regarded as a special form of blunt trauma. show increased amount of tissue destruction due to the high velocities involved. Usually have an entrance and exit wound unless bullet has struck a bony area such as the skull. The rifled weapon: The rifled weapon:
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Bullet wound trajectory through JF Kennedy's skull
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Rifle weapons differ from shotguns in that: they fire one projectile at a time thicker barrel that has spiral grooves machined on its inner surface. he elevations between the grooves are the 'lands', which grip the bullet as it passes down the barrel and give it a rotatory movement. This has a gyroscopic effect that increases the stability of the bullet's trajectory and hence the accuracy. here is only one missile in each discharge.
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The entrance wounds The entrance wounds have the following characteristics: 1.Central defect – the diameter approximates that of the penetrating projectile. The head of the projectile causes tissue destruction on impact, whilst the periphery suffers irreversible compression. 2.Ring of dirt due to black powder residue, gun oil or dirt rubbed off the projectile during penetration, comes from the head of the bullet – not the body (which does not contact the wound edges). 3.Abrasion ring – symmetrical, concentric ring around the central defect during a head-on impact of the projectile. 4.Inverted edges - The skin moves away from the projectile, upon impact. It bulges outward and the temporary entrance hole contracts after the projectile passes through.
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entrance wounds entrance wounds
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The abrasion ring, and a very clear muzzle imprint, are seen in this contact range gunshot wound. Muzzle mark
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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23 - Firearm Injuries Part2 - Rifled Weapon Wounds Rifled...

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