Electrical Injuries

Electrical Injuries - Electrical Injuries Stephen Hunt...

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Stanford University Medical Center December 21, 2011 Electrical Injuries Stephen Hunt
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December 21, 2011 2 Electrical Injury Epidemiology Mechanisms of injury Associated injuries Management Prognosis
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December 21, 2011 3 Epidemiology: Account for ~ 3% all burn-related injuries Estimated 3,000 annual admits to burn units ~ 1/3 fatal - about 1,000 US deaths annually Bimodal distribution ~1/3 children <6 yrs (electric cords & wall outlets) Common cause occupational deaths Lightning responsible for ~300 injuries, 100 deaths
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December 21, 2011 4 Physics Review I = V/R (Ohm’s Law - current) Intensity expressed in amperes (A) DC - lightning, rails, autos, batteries AC - most power lines, buildings E = IVT (Joules law - thermal energy) E = I 2 RT
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December 21, 2011 5 Mechanisms of Injury Direct effect of electrical current Thermal burns (conversion I->E) Mechanical Trauma Post-trauma sequelae
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December 21, 2011 6 Direct effects of current I = V/R In general, type & extent of injury depends on current intensity (amps) Type of current (DC vs AC), current pathway, and duration of current also influence severity of injury As current generally not known, injuries often classified into high V ( > 1,000V) vs low V Cardiac, neurologic and respiratory systems most susceptible to direct effects Skin is the resistor most effecting severity of injury Wet skin has lower R (~1K ohm) vs. dry or thick skin (>100K ohm), resulting in greater current flow
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December 21, 2011 7 Thermal (Burn) Injuries Heat (E) = IVT = I 2 RT
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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Electrical Injuries - Electrical Injuries Stephen Hunt...

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