2 - Fractures - Principles 2

2 - Fractures - Principles 2 - Principles of fractures...

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Principles of fractures Principles of fractures Mohammad Ararawi
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Principles of fractures Principles of fractures Definition A bone fracture (sometimes abbreviated # or Fx ) is a medical condition in which a bone is cracked or broken; it is a break in the continuity of bone. Fractures occur when a bone can't withstand the physical force exerted on it. Bone fracture may be caused by traumatic incident, or also can occur as a result of certain medical conditions that weaken the bones, that may be localized or generalized.
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Principles of fractures Principles of fractures Classification In orthopedic medicine, fractures are classified as closed or open (compound) and simple or multi- fragmentary (formerly comminuted ). Closed fractures are those in which the skin is intact. open (compound) fractures involve wounds that communicate with the fracture and may expose bone to contamination, may be from inside or outside.
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Principles of fractures Principles of fractures Classification Simple fractures are fractures that only occur along one line, splitting the bone into two pieces. multi-fragmentary fractures involve the bone splitting into multiple pieces.
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Principles of fractures Principles of fractures Description Description Complete Fracture- A fracture in which bone fragments separate completely. Transverse Fracture- A fracture that is at a right angle to the bone's long axis. Oblique Fracture- A fracture that is diagonal to a bone's long axis. Spiral Fracture- A fracture where at least one part of the bone has been twisted. Compacted Fracture- A fracture caused when bone fragments are driven into each other. Comminuted Fracture. Double or segmental Fx, occur at two levels with free segment between them.
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Principles of fractures Principles of fractures Description Description Incomplete Fracture- A fracture in which the bone fragments are still partially joined. Greenstick fractures in children, the spriny bone in childhood, buckles on the side opposite to the causal force, where periosteum remains intact. a compression fracture, an example of a compression fracture is when the front portion of a vertebra in the spine collapses due to osteoporosis. Reduction is not required in vertebral body fracture,But it is necessary when the fractures are part of joint.
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Greenstick fracture of radius and Greenstick fracture of radius and ulna ulna
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Principles of fractures Principles of fractures A stable fracture is one which is likely to stay in a good (functional) position while it heals. An unstable Fx is likely to angulate or rotate before healing and lead to poor function in the long term. a fracture of the bony components of the joint is
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This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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2 - Fractures - Principles 2 - Principles of fractures...

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