11 - Septic arthritis - D3

11 - Septic arthritis - D3 - septic arthritis is an...

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septic arthritis is an inflammatory joint disease caused by bacterial, viral, and fungal infection.
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Route of infection dissemination of pathogens via the blood, from distant site…. (most common) dissemination from an acute osteomylitic focus dissemination from adjacent soft tissue infection, entry via penetrating trauma entry via iatrogenic means
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Etiology The causal organism is usually Staphylococcus aureus . In children under the age of 3 years Haemophilus influenzae is fairly common gram-negative bacilli (a group of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, or E. coli) streptococci (a group of bacteria that can lead to a wide variety of diseases)
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Pathology There is an acute synovitis with a purulent joint effusion and Synovial membrane becomes edematous, swollen and hyperemic, and produces increase amount of cloudy exudates contains leukocytes and bacteria As infection spread through the joint, articular cartilage is destroyed by bacterial and cellular enzymes. If the infection is not arrested the cartilage may be completely destroyed. Pus may burst out of the joint to form abscesses and sinuses. The joint may be become pathologically dislocated.
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With healing there will be: Complete resolution and return to normal. Partial loss of cartilage and fibrosis. Bone ankylosis Bone destruction and permanent deformity.
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Clinical presentation Typical features are acute pain and swelling in a single large joint ,commonly the hip in children and the knee in adults , however any joint can be affected. The most commonly involved joint is the knee (50% of cases), followed by the hip (20%), shoulder (8%), ankle (7%), and wrists (7%). interphalangeal, sternoclavicular, and sacroiliac joints each make up 1-4% of cases.
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1. Symptoms in newborns or infants: The emphasis is on septicemia rather than joint pain. Irritability ,Fever, refuses to feed, rapid pulse.
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This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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11 - Septic arthritis - D3 - septic arthritis is an...

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