15_Injuries_to_the_Head_and_Spine

15_Injuries_to_the_Head_and_Spine - 15-1Injuries to the...

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Unformatted text preview: 15-1Injuries to the Head and SpineLesson 1515-2Introduction•May be life threatening or cause permanent damage•Trauma to head, neck, torso may result in serious injury•Injuries without immediate obvious signs and symptoms may involve potentially life-threatening problem•Any head injury may also injure spine 15-3Common Mechanisms of Head and Spinal Injuries•Motor vehicle crashes/pedestrian-vehicle collisions•Falls•Diving•Skiing and other sports injuries•Forceful blunt/penetrating trauma to head, neck, torso•Hanging incidents15-4Suspect a Head or Spinal Injury•With any unresponsive trauma patient•When wounds or other injuries suggest large forces involved•Observe patient carefully during the initial assessment15-5Head Injuries15-6Injuries to the Head•May be open or closed•Bleeding may be profuse•Closed injuries may involve swelling/ depression at site of skull fracture•Bleeding inside skull may occur with any head injury15-7General Signs and Symptoms•Lump or deformity in head, neck, or back•Changing levels of responsiveness•Drowsiness•Confusion•Dizziness•Unequal pupils15-8General Signs and Symptoms continued•Headache•Clear fluid from nose or ears•Stiff neck•Inability to move any body part•Tingling, numbness, or lack of feeling in feet or hands15-9Assessing an Unresponsive Patient•If no life-threatening condition perform limited physical examination for other injuries•Do not move patient unless necessary•Check for serious injuries•Stabilize head and neck15-10Assessing an Unresponsive Patient•Ask those at scene:–What happened–Patient’s mental status before becoming unresponsive15-11Assessing a Responsive Patient•If nature of injuries suggests potential spinal injury, carefully assess for spinal injury during physical examination•Ask patient not to move more than you ask during the examination15-12Assessing a Responsive Patient•Ask:–Does your neck or back hurt?–What happened?...
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This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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15_Injuries_to_the_Head_and_Spine - 15-1Injuries to the...

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