BronchitisPneumonia

BronchitisPneumonia - Bronchitis,Pneumonia,and...

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    Bronchitis, Pneumonia, and  Pleural Empyema Katay Bouttamy DO Tintinalli Chapter 63
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Acute Bronchitis Definition: an acute respiratory tract  infection with cough being the  predominant feature Usually lasts 1 to 3 weeks, peaks  between October and March Viruses cause the vast majority of  cases: Influenza A and B,  parainfluenza, and RSV are the most  common
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Acute Bronchitis Bordetella pertussis, Mycoplasma  pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae,  and Legionella species are reported in  5-25% of cases Clinical features: cough and wheezing  are the strongest positive predictors,  less than 10% of patients are febrile
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Acute Bronchitis Diagnosis: (1) acute cough less than 1-2  weeks (2) no prior lung disease (3) no  auscultatory abnormalities that suggest  pneumonia Treatment: studies have failed to show  significant improvement with Abx therapy and  at best may decrease duration of cough,  decrease purulent sputum production and  return patients to work < 1 day each
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Acute Exacerbation of Chronic  Bronchitis Two-thirds are bacterial in origin (H. flu, Strep  pneumo, M. Catarrhalis) High risk patients are the elderly and those  with poor lung function and with comorbid  conditions Characterized by increased dyspnea,  increased cough and sputum production and  purulence with underlying COPD Treatment includes doxycycline, extended  spectrum cephalosporin, macrolide,  augmentin or fluoroquinolone
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Pneumonia CAP is 6 th  leading cause of death Studies of both inpatients and  outpatients with CAP fail to identify a  specific pathogen in 40-60% of patients  but when found pneumococcus is still  the most common
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Pneumonia Typical presentation of pneumococcal  pneumonia is sudden onset of fever,  rigors, dyspnea, bloody sputum  production, chest pain, tachycardia,  tachypnea and abnormal findings on  lung exam Some of the atypicals are associated  with headache and GI illness
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This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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BronchitisPneumonia - Bronchitis,Pneumonia,and...

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