cytomegalovirus - Introduction Most common congenital &...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction Most common congenital & perinatal infection. Affects 0.4% to 2.3% of all live births world wide. Leading viral cause of neonatal brain damage. Estimated cost /yr. of treating CMV infections & complications in USA is currently $ 2 billion. Characteristic cells found in cytomegalic inclusion disease owls eyes. Double stranded DNA virus, largest of the Herpes family. Pathognomic features on light microscopy: Large cells (cytomegalo) intranuclear & cytoplasmic inclusion bodies areas of focal necrosis & calcification History 1881- Ribbert - inclusion bearing cells under light microscope. 1921 Goodpasrure & Talbert - cytomegalia is due to a viral agent. 1950 -- Smith & Vellios show that infection can occur in utero. 1956- 57 - Smith,Weller et al independently isolate strains of CMV 1960 Weller proposed - Cytomegalovirus, isolated it from urine of symptomatic infants. Prevalence Found in all geographical areas of the world. 40-60% adults in middle/ upper SE class, 80% in lower class have anti CMV antibodies (USA/UK) Increased seropositivity associated with : non caucasian race, unmarried mother, lower educational & SE status, increasing parity, sexual activity in...
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This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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cytomegalovirus - Introduction Most common congenital &...

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