Hemodialysis catheter infection

Hemodialysis catheter infection - emodialysis catheter...

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Unformatted text preview: emodialysis catheter infection cary facts In 2006, 82% of patients in the United States initiated dialysis via a catheter The overall likelihood of Tunneled cuffed catheters use was 35% greater in 2005 compared with 1996 TCCs have been found to be associated with as much as a threefold increased mortality compared with AVFs Sepsis-related death is 100 times greater in dialysis patients than in the general population Infection-related death and all-cause mortality are highest in those with TCCs The cost of placing a TCC is approximately $13,000, and that of treating one TCC-related episode of bacteremia is as high as $45,000 A several-fold increase in cardiovascular risk is also noted with TCCs Primary TCC failure rate is 52% to 91% per year Poor quality of life, reduced dialysis adequacy, and central venous stenosis that may preclude subsequent AVF creation are additional complications associated with TCCs atheter related bacteremia Bacteremia frequently complicates catheter use in hemodialysis patients In a prospective follow-up of 108 patients with tunneled dialysis catheters, the first episode of catheter-related bacteremia developed in 35% within 3 mo and in 48% after 6 mo The frequency of catheter-related bacteremia has ranged from 2.0 to 5.5 episodes per 1000 catheter-days at several dialysis centers or 0.9-2.0 episodes per patient-year Serious complications, including infective endocarditis, septic arthritis, septic emboli, osteomyelitis, epidural abscess and severe sepsis, have been reported in 20% of cases S. aureus has been predominantly isolated from those patients as a result of the predilection of S. aureus for heart valves and bone redisposing factors The incidence of CRB associated with nontunneled catheters is highest for femoral catheters, followed by internal jugular catheters then subclavian catheters (7.6, 5.6, and 0.7 episodes per 1,000 catheter-days, respectively) The lower risk of infection with subclavian catheters might not apply to tunneled catheters, and the subclavian location is associated with the highest rate of future catheter-associated central venous stenosis Although the duration of primary catheter patency is...
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This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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Hemodialysis catheter infection - emodialysis catheter...

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