Pediatric Environmental Health

Pediatric - Pediatric Environmental Health Health Christine L Johnson MD Maj USAF MC Assistant Professor of Pediatrics USUHS June 2001 Background

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Pediatric Environmental Pediatric Environmental Health Health Christine L. Johnson, MD Maj, USAF, MC Assistant Professor of Pediatrics USUHS June 2001
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background Background The field of Pediatric Environmental Health is rapidly evolving, yet, information pertinent to this field is widely scattered and infrequently evaluated by clinicians. The field is still in the early stages of development with knowledge in some areas increasing and some areas where there are still more questions than answers.
Background image of page 2
Background Background In 1995, the EPA formulated a national policy requiring that the health risks to children and infants, from environmental hazards, be considered when conducting environmental risk assessments. Many new programs have been initiated to stimulated necessary research into the impact of the environment on the health of children. Environmental hazards are among the top health concerns many parents have for their children.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Children Are Different Than Children Are Different Than Adults Adults Children are uniquely vulnerable to environmental hazards and they should not be treated as “little adults”. Differences in exposure, absorption, metabolism, distribution, and target organ susceptibilities are age-specific factors affecting an individual’s risk for an environmentally related illness.
Background image of page 4
Exposure Children, depending on their developmental stage, will have vastly different environments. Remember to consider exposures in all environments, throughout the day. Pre-ambulating children cannot remove themselves from a hazardous environment. The metabolic rate of children is higher, because of their larger surface-to-volume ratio, therefore they have greater exposure to air pollutants. The amount of food consumed per kilogram of
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/24/2011 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

Page1 / 21

Pediatric - Pediatric Environmental Health Health Christine L Johnson MD Maj USAF MC Assistant Professor of Pediatrics USUHS June 2001 Background

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online