Vibrating_String_Lab

Vibrating_String_Lab - Ananth Bulusu Michael Burket...

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Ananth Bulusu Michael Burket Vibrating String Physics 201 Monday 11/16/09 Abstract The Vibrating String lab was conducted in order to determine the relationship between frequency, tension, wavelength, and speed by studying standing waves on a vibrating spring. We were able to study the standing waves on a vibrating string by using two strings with different mass densities and vibrating them with various tensions applied to the string. We were able to determine that as tension applied to the string decreased the frequency increased. This is evidenced by the equation Introduction In this lab we used two different strings with different linear mass densities to determine the relationship between frequency, tension, wavelength, and speed. Frequency is the amount of full vibrations of a waveform per second and is inversely proportional to wavelength. This means that as frequency increases the shorter the
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wavelength. In this lab we see that when the tension on the string was greater the frequency was very low, therefore the wavelength was longer. As the tension on the string decreased the frequency increased, therefore having longer wavelengths. Wave speed is constant and is always the same, so change in tension has no effect on speed. Vibrating strings is a very important concept in many areas of everyday life.
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course PHYS 211L taught by Professor Mr.crittenden during the Fall '11 term at South Carolina.

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Vibrating_String_Lab - Ananth Bulusu Michael Burket...

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