3.3.2011 Emotion

3.3.2011 Emotion - Emotions Emotion Emotioninvolves: 1)...

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Emotions
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Emotion Emotion involves:  1) Bodily arousal 2) Conscious experience 3) Expressive behaviors. Emotions affect our action .
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Controversy 1) Does physiological arousal  precede  or  follow  emotional experience? 2) Does cognition precede  or  follow  emotion?
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Commonsense View As you become  happy your heart  starts beating faster. Conscious awareness  comes first and is  followed by  physiological  activity.
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James-Lange Theory The James-Lange theory  proposes that physiological  activity precedes  the  emotional experience. You feel emotions  because  of  the physiological  response.
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Cannon-Bard Theory Physiological arousal is not  very specific and often slow.  Can occur without emotion. Cannon and Bard proposed  that the cortical awareness of  emotion  andsubcorticallydriven  physical arousal take place  simultaneously .
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Two-Factor Theory Schachterand Singer  proposed that our  physiology and our  cognitions  together  cause  emotions. Emotions consist of two  factors–physical arousal  and cognitive appraisal. Cognitive  appraisal: I’m going  to get hit!
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Evaluating the theories: Physiological response and emotion Assessing theories requires detailed  examination of physiological components of  emotion.   If James and Lange are right, physiological  responses should be rapid and distinct. If Cannon and Bard or Schacter and Singer are  right, physiological responses may be similar.
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Embodied emotions:  Autonomic responses During an emotional experience our autonomic  nervous system  mobilizes energy in the body and  arouses us.
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Physiological Differences Some physical responses vary between emotions like  fear, rage and joy. Patterns of brain activity vary across emotions: Different parts of amygdala active during fear vs. rage.  Left hemisphere more active during happy emotions, right  more active during negative emotions.
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Physiological Similarities Physiological responses are similar across the  emotions of fear, anger, excitement and sexual  passion though they  feel  very different!
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Evaluating the theories: Cognition and Emotion What is the connection between how we think 
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This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course PSYCH 102 taught by Professor Jared during the Spring '07 term at Rutgers.

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3.3.2011 Emotion - Emotions Emotion Emotioninvolves: 1)...

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