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Sylvia Plath biography

Sylvia Plath biography - The Path of a Writer Sylvia Plath...

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The Path of a Writer Sylvia Plath is an anti-hero for many women. Her suicide at the age of 30 makes her an icon for all women struggling with their identity. Her last book of poetry, Ariel , was published three years after her death, but her writing career began much earlier. Sylvia Plath was born in the Jamaica Plain section of Boston, Massachusetts on October 27, 1932. Her father, Otto Plath, was a professor of German and entomology at Boston University. Her mother, Aurelia Schober Plath, had been in one of Otto’s German classes there. She became a high school teacher and also assisted him in his research and writing. Education and knowledge were important to her parents, so Sylvia “learned to develop language skills that won her parents’ attention” by making up rhymes and stories at an early age (Wagner-Martin 24). Due to complications with diabetes, Otto Plath died when Sylvia was eight. Aurelia received help from her parents, but Sylvia suffered without a father figure. She “was less sure about her place in the world…about her very existence” (30). Two years later, the Plaths and Schobers moved to Wellesley, Massachusetts where Aurelia started working fulltime at Boston University. Sylvia’s interest in art and writing flourished during this time and she was published in various places. She was an exemplary student and chose many extracurricular activities. “From early childhood, she learned that her parents’ love depended on her achievements” (Wagner-Martin 46). Her English teacher and mentor, Wilbury Crockett, “wondered if she ever relaxed” (44). Sylvia struggled with a continual desire to achieve her idea of perfection in spite of all her accomplishments. She also put emphasis on the importance of dating, believing it to be “unfeminine” not to marry (50). In 1950, Sylvia began studying at Smith College in Northampton University. Here, she continued to excel at her studies, but was troubled socially. Because she was a scholarship
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student, she did not fit in with her wealthier classmates. There was “an ever-widening difference
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