PreColumbian Art

PreColumbian Art - -shamans depicted with batwings because...

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PreColumbian Art; Miscellaneous facts - Aale - from Yoruba, Africa -sculpture with spiritual energy that warns intruders not to venture further -created at edge of farmer’s field to mark boundaries -could be considered altar/offering - Masqueraders inside Sacred Forest ** - the Senufo, in Africa -the sacred forest has never been cut down -sacred men’s space -entrance is impermissible -it equals church/mosque/synagogue; essentially a holy place of worship -rafia fiber woven tent -huge marionette with two men inside -represents animal with particular symbolism (possibly antelope) - Olmec Bloodletting Rituals -injure self in key body parts (tongue/cheek/penis) to go into trance from loss of blood -during trance one communicates with Gods -often done in accordance with use of psychoactive drugs - Olmec theories on liminal creatures/people
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Unformatted text preview: -shamans depicted with batwings because bats are liminal (in between)-bats are different/mysterious because they are nocturnal and go against the norm -shamans are liminal people-one foot in spirit world and one in human world-this is why they are depicted with animal features-the animals are usually jaguars/bats/harpys/palm vipers-Olmec Quetzal Bird-beautiful iridescent green tail feathers-tail feathers are incredibly desirable trade items-green color suggests sprouting corn as well as royalty and shamanism-Olmec palm viper-Shaman transformation animal-fast acting poison-most often lives in trees and attacks from above-liminal creature; not just physically dangerous but in wrong place for snake-scaly eyebrows often depicted-Olmec Shamans only transform into Jaguars, Harpy Eagles, and Palm Vipers...
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This note was uploaded on 12/22/2011 for the course ART HIST 250 taught by Professor Brett-smith during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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