History_Intro - ME 270 Basic Mechanics I, ME 274 Basic...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 ME 270 – Basic Mechanics I, ME 274 – Basic Mechanics II Eric Nauman, Ph.D. Office: ME 187 Email: enauman@purdue.edu Introduction to Engineering Mechanics I. Overview Mechanics is the science that describes and predicts the conditions of rest or motion of bodies subjected to forces. In engineering, we customarily divide mechanics into three disciplines, Mechanics of Rigid Bodies, Mechanics of Deformable Bodies, and Mechanics of Fluids (including liquids and gases). Each one of these groups can be further divided as shown in Figure 1. Continuum Mechanics and numerical methods such as Finite Element Analysis are general theories that, in principle, encompass the entire field. Statics is the most fundamental field of Engineering Mechanics and is usually defined as “the analysis of bodies at rest or moving with constant velocity under the influence of various kinds of forces.” The concepts addressed herein are prerequisites for virtually all the courses in civil, environmental, mechanical, industrial, and biomedical engineering.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Figure 1 – The subdisciplines within Engineering Mechanics include Mechanics of Rigid Bodies, Mechanics of Deformable Bodies, and Mechanics of Fluids. Each one of these can be further divided as shown. Continuum Mechanics and numerical methods such as Finite Element Analysis are general theories that, in principle, encompass the entire field. II. Historical Perspective Prior to Newton’s many and varied discoveries, progress in the field of mechanics occurred slowly. Aristotle (384 – 322 B.C.) was the first to investigate the statics of levers and developed some of the first theories of dynamics [1, 2]. Archimedes (287 – 212 B.C.) explained the lever fulcrum and the theory of buoyancy [2]. Possibly because too much credit was given the early philosophers, there were very few developments over the next 1600 years. Not until Leonardo da Vinci (1452 – 1519) continued Archimedes’ work on levers was any substantial
Background image of page 2
3 progress made. Of particular importance was da Vinci’s theory of moments in relation to the equilibrium of three-dimensional bodies [2]. The sixteenth century witnessed a number of important developments. Tycho Brahe made extremely accurate astronomical measurements that were later analyzed by Kepler and formed the basis of his three laws [3]: 1. The path of each planet is an ellipse with the Sun at a focus. 2. A straight line joining the Sun and a planet sweeps out equal areas in equal times. 3. The square of each planet’s period is proportional to the cube of the semi- major axis of its elliptic orbit. It is worth noting that these three laws took years to verify and were later shown to be a consequence of Newton’s Law of Gravitation. Subsequently, Stevinus (1548 – 1620), Galileo (1564 – 1642), and Descartes (1596 –
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/21/2011 for the course ME 270 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

Page1 / 9

History_Intro - ME 270 Basic Mechanics I, ME 274 Basic...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online