lab6_Fall10 - ME 365 EXPERIMENT 6 SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION...

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ME 365 EXPERIMENT 6 SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION Objectives: This experiment examines commonly used techniques for identifying systems in both the time and frequency domains. System identification is an important step in developing mathematical models to be used for systems and control design. In this experiment, we will be studying a group of systems and estimating the model parameters that best characterize them. It should be noted that system identification techniques may also be used to estimate the structure, or order, of the model. Here we will be assuming that the systems are characterized by ideal second order frequency response functions. After completing this lab, you should be able to: Use time domain techniques to experimentally determine the parameters of a second order system. Use frequency domain techniques to experimentally determine the parameters of a second order system. Conclude which identification techniques provide the best estimates of the system parameters and under what circumstances they work best. Procedure: RLC Circuit: In this laboratory, we will be identifying the model parameters associated with the RLC circuit, shown in Figure 1, which exhibits primarily second order behavior. Figure 1: The RLC Circuit Used in this Laboratory Similar mechanical systems, e.g. a mass/spring/damper, often modeled as ideal second order systems, may in actuality be better characterized by higher order systems and are often subject to nonlinearities. It is for this reason that we will practice our system identification techniques on the "better behaved" RLC circuit. That is not to say that R L = 4.5 H V in C = 0.01 F V out R = 0 1 K 10 K 100 K
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Laboratory 6 System Identification ME 365 -2- these techniques have no use for complex systems. They may be used to determine the dominant nature of the response and the overall system order, albeit with some care. Time Domain System ID: Build the circuit as shown using the first resistor, in the case of R = 0 , a simple wire connection will suffice. Apply a 5 Hz, 2 volt RMS square wave signal to the input of the circuit, and attach the output of the circuit to the oscilloscope and channel 0 of the data acquisition interface board. The low frequency square wave acts like a series of step
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This note was uploaded on 12/26/2011 for the course ME 365 taught by Professor Merkle during the Fall '07 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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lab6_Fall10 - ME 365 EXPERIMENT 6 SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION...

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