2001ExcelFormulasMono

2001ExcelFormulasMono - Notes on Excel Calculations EXCEL...

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Notes on Excel Calculations E XCEL R EVIEW 2001-2002
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This handout is meant to serve as a quick review of some of the principal features of Excel formulas and calculations. It’s not meant to cover Excel’s formulas or calculations in great depth. This guide may jog your memory about a feature or two you might have used and then forgotten or introduce you to something new in Excel that you’d like to explore further. If you’re not already familiar with a feature described here and you think it might be useful to you, I hope you’ll consult Excel’s online help or a good reference guide for a complete description. Examples and illustrations are drawn from Excel 2000. Paula Ecklund Spring 2001
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Contents Page I. Formula Basics The Building Blocks: Values, Cell References, & Operators . ................................. 1 Excel’s Order of Calculations. ................................................................................. 4 Controlling Calculation in Workbooks . ................................................................. 5 Entering & Editing Formulas. ................................................................................. 7 Formula-Building Recommendations. ................................................................... 10 Calculating With Date & Time Values . .................................................................. 11 Replacing a Formula With a Value. ........................................................................ 12 Naming Cells & Ranges Used in Formulas. ........................................................... 13 Using a Formula to Name a Range. ........................................................................ 16 Understanding Relative, Absolute, and Mixed Addressing. ................................. 19 How to Display Formulas in a Worksheet. ............................................................ 22 Array Formulas. ...................................................................................................... 23 Precision in Calculations. ........................................................................................ 25 Edit, Fill, Series . ...................................................................................................... 26 Quick Calculations With the Status Bar. ................................................................ 27 Finding Formulas. ................................................................................................... 28 Writing and Using Formulas With Links. .............................................................. 29 Auditing Your Formulas. ....................................................................................... 31 II. Excel’s Built-in Calculations Using Built-in Functions. ........................................................................................ 33 The Data Analysis Toolbox. .................................................................................... 35 IF and the Logical Functions. .................................................................................. 37 An Introduction: Writing Your Own Functions. .................................................... 39 III. Other Resources ................................................................................................... 75
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1 I. Formula Basics ü The Building Blocks: Values, Cell References, & Operators The building blocks of Excel formulas are values, cell references, and operators. A value can take the form of a number (20, 100, .015), text (“The Fuqua School of Business”, “Duke basketball”), or a date (4/1/01, April 1, 2001). cell reference identifies a single cell or a range of cells on a worksheet and tells Excel where to look for the values or data you want to use in a formula. With references, you can use data contained in different parts of a worksheet in a single formula or use the value from one cell in several formulas. You can also refer to cells on other sheets in the same workbook, to other workbooks, and to data in other programs. References to cells in other workbooks are called external references. References to data in other programs are called remote references. Excel has two cell reference styles: The A1 style and the R1C1 reference style. By default, Excel uses the A1 reference style. This style refers to columns with letters (A through IV, for a total of 256 columns) and to rows with numbers (1 through 65,536). These letters and numbers are called row and column headings. To refer to a cell, enter the column letter followed by the row number. For example, D50 refers to the cell at the intersection of column D and row 50. To refer to a range of cells, enter the reference for the cell in the upper-left corner of the range, a colon ( J , and then the reference to the cell in the lower-right corner of the range.
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This note was uploaded on 12/20/2011 for the course BUS 101 taught by Professor Ecklund during the Spring '01 term at Duke.

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2001ExcelFormulasMono - Notes on Excel Calculations EXCEL...

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